In this post we learn how to build a simple yet accurate timer circuit using the IC 4060 and some ordinary passive components.

Timers were used in many applications in our day to day life. One can see the timers in washing machines,micro ovens etc. These devices uses timer to switch the loads for particular amount of time.

You can use this circuit for charging Mobile phone for a specified predetermined length of time. This timer circuit could be yet again initiated simply by pressing the push button for the next charging cycle.

Simple Timer Circuit Diagram

Simple Timer Circuit With IC 4060

The Cmos 4060:-

The Cmos 4060 is a 14 bit binary counter with a built in oscillator. The oscillator consists of the two inverters connected to Pins 9, 10 & 11; and its frequency is set by R3, R4 & C3. 

The green Led flashes while the oscillator is running: and the IC counts the number of oscillations. Although it’s a 14 bit counter, not all of the bits are accessible. Those that can be reached are shown on the drawing.

By adjusting the frequency of the oscillator you can set the length of time it takes for any given output to go high. This output then switches the transistor; which in turn operates the relay. At the same time, D1 stops the count by disabling the oscillator.

 Ideally C3 should be non-polarized; but a regular electrolytic will work, provided it doesn’t leak too badly in the reverse direction. Alternatively, you can simulate a non-polarized 10uF capacitor by connecting two 22uF capacitors back to back (as shown).

How To Setup Timer

Using “Trial and Error” to set a long time period would be very tedious. A better solution is to use the Setup tables provided; and calculate the time required for Pin 7 to go high. The Setup tables on both schematics are interchangeable. They’re just two different ways of expressing the same equation.

For example, if you want a period of 9 Hours, the Range table shows that you can use the output at Pin 2. You need Pin 2 to go high after 9 x 60 x 60 = 32 400 seconds. 

The Setup table tells you to divide this by 512; giving about 63 seconds. Adjust R4 so that the RED LED lights 63 seconds after power is applied. This will give an output at Pin 2 after about 9 Hours.

This Timer Circuit Diagram was designed for a 12-volt supply. However, provided a suitable relay is used, the circuit will work at anything from 5 to 15-volts. Applying power starts the timer. It can be reset at any time by a brief interruption of the power supply. The reset button is optional; but it should NOT be used during setup. The time it takes for the RED LED to light MUST be measured from the moment power is applied. Although R1, R2 and the two LEDs help with the setup, they are not necessary to the operation of the timer. 

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